How to Network for success in science

 

Friday, June 16, 2017 | 4:30pm - 5:00pm | Broad Institute Auditorium

 Daniel Jay, PhD

Daniel Jay, PhD

POSTDOCTORAL OFFICER & PROFESSOR OF DEVELOPMENTAL, MOLECULAR & CHEMICAL BIOLOGY AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Network Like A Pro: An Example Combining Art and Science

We all know that presenting our data at scientific meetings is a critical way of raising awareness about our research and promoting our science, but did you know that networking during these events is also critical for success as a scientist? Learn about the benefits of networking at scientific conferences and how to make connections that will help your career! 


Meet the Scientists

Saturday, June 17, 2017 | 1:00pm - 2:00pm | Yellowstone Room - 2nd Floor 

 Jennifer Elliott

Jennifer Elliott

SENIOR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER AT SGI-DNA

Vibrio natriegens as a fast-growing host for molecular biology

A rapidly growing bacterial host would be desirable for a range of routine applications in molecular biology and biotechnology. The bacterium Vibrio natriegens has the fastest growth rate of any known organism, with a reported doubling time of <10 min. We report the development of genetic tools and methods to engineer V. natriegens and demonstrate the advantages of using these engineered strains in common biotech processes.

 
 Isaac Houston, PhD, MBA

Isaac Houston, PhD, MBA

QIAGEN LIFE SCIENCE SPECIALIST

QIAseq Technologies for Metagenomics and Microbiome NGS library prep

In this presentation, learn about the innovative technologies that form the basis of QIAGEN’s portfolio of QIAseq library prep solutions for metagenomics and microbiome sequencing. Whether your research starts from single microbial cells, 16s rRNA PCR amplicons, or gDNA for whole genome analysis, QIAseq technologies offer tips and tricks for capturing the genomic diversity of your samples in the most unbiased, streamlined way possible.

 
 Aron Jaffe, PhD

Aron Jaffe, PhD

group leader, tissue repair & microbiome at NOVARTIS INSTITUTES FOR BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH

Mechanisms regulating lineage decisions in the airway

The functions performed by epithelial tissues are dictated by the types, abundance, and distribution of differentiated cells generated by stem/progenitor cells.  In the conducting airway, the basal stem cell generates two major differentiated cell types that act coordinately to perform mucociliary clearance to rid the airway of pathogens: secretory cells, which produce mucins that trap pathogens, and multiciliated cells, which beat to push the mucus up and out of the airways. An imbalance in the abundance of these two differentiated cell types, leading to goblet cell metaplasia and increased mucus production, is seen in a variety of airway diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF).  In this presentation I will discuss our work investigating the regulation of cell fate decisions in the airway.

 
 Ania Wronski, PhD

Ania Wronski, PhD

FIELD APPLICATION SCIENTIST IN DRUG DISCOVERY AND STEM CELLS AT THERMO FISHER SCIENTIFIC

Evolving iPSCs for the next challenge: gene editing & automation

Discovery and utilization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was heralded as the missing link to enable us to finally model and cure diseases. Now with the ability to engineer the genome with precision, iPSC can finally be applied to basic research as well as drug discovery. In this seminar, we will discuss some of the challenges facing stem cell researchers in applying next generation techniques such as genome editing for disease modeling and drug discovery and offer potential solutions.